The Breach of Security That Revealed the Secret World of the Vatican

The butler did it! That was the tabloid take on the unprecedented breach of security that shook the Vatican last year, when a trove of secrets plucked from one of the most impenetrable places on earth—the pope’s private quarters—was leaked to the media. But why did he do it? And did he act alone?

Murder of an Idealist

For six hours on September 11, the American compounds in Benghazi, Libya, stood siege. When the attack was over, J. Christopher Stevens’s body was pulled from the wreckage—the first U.S. ambassador killed by militants in over thirty years. Since then, his death has been politicized and the details of the attack distorted. Sean Flynn straightens out the story of Stevens’s last days in Libya—and reveals the true believer we lost that day.

"Is he coming? Is he? Oh God, I think he is."

One year ago, a heavily armed man dressed as a police officer appeared on the beach of a youth summer camp in Norway. The kids had no way of knowing he was targeting them for the ills of Europe. Then he started shooting. And shooting. Where were the real cops? By the end of the day, seventy-seven people had been killed, the deadliest attack in that country since World War II. As told by the survivors, these are the beat-by-beat horrors of those terrifying 198 minutes.

Three at Last!

They are notorious for, and can never escape, a crime they didn’t commit. Eighteen years ago, three teenagers in Arkansas were falsely accused of the murders of three young boys. It was an astounding abuse of justice, and it was all caught on film, in a series of HBO documentaries that gained a cult following and led celebrities like Johnny Depp and Eddie Vedder to take up the cause. Suddenly released this summer, the West Memphis Three are now free to pick up their lives—if they can even find them.

His Own Private Idaho

Ten years ago, a man moved to Marsing, Idaho. He had a strange accent and didn’t know much about cattle. The folks in Marsing were a little skeptical at first, but when he built a house and started a family, he earned his neighbors’ acceptance. Last February, while buying hay, he was cornered by federal agents and arrested for violent crimes tied to the Boston Mob. And the town wondered: Who the hell is Jay Shaw?

Way Down in the Hole

For more than two months, thirty-three men have been stuck deep underground, trapped in the stifling confines of a Chilean copper mine. Now, on the eve of their rescue, Sean Flynn reports on the circus at Camp Hope—mistresses! mysteries! miracles! cannibals!—and unearths the deeper stories of men who would happily trade their fates for a few dark months down below

Boom

Lost in the catastrophic aftermath of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill is the gripping tale of the rig workers and the Coast Guard crewmen who rescued them.

The Longest Night

One Easter Sunday, the Alaska Ranger—a fishing boat out of Dutch Harbor—went down in the Bering Sea, 6,000 feet deep and thirty-two degrees cold. Forty-seven people were on board, and nearly half of them would spend hours floating alone in the darkness, in water so frigid it can kill a man in minutes. Forty-two of them would be rescued. Here’s how.

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